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Freedom of the ScreenLegal Challenges to State Film Censorship, 1915-1981$
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Laura Wittern-Keller

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813124513

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813124513.001.0001

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Denouement, 1965–1981

Denouement, 1965–1981

Chapter:
(p.247) 12 Denouement, 1965–1981
Source:
Freedom of the Screen
Author(s):

Laura Wittern-Keller

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813124513.003.0013

This chapter discusses a new culture which started in the 1950s and prevailed in the 1960s. It was based more on pacifism, egalitarianism, openness, and individuality. The growth of this new culture was aided by the rise of national media such as radio networks, television, and movies. The censors, on the other hand, were losing control of movie content, which they had once held in a lockdown. The chapter looks at the legacy of Ronald Freedman and the events—and movies—that followed after freedom of the screen was finally achieved. Peep shows and the infamous Deep Throat are also discussed here.

Keywords:   new culture, censors, Ronald Freedman, freedom, peep shows, Deep Throat, movie content, pacifism, egalitarianism, individuality

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