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The LineCombat in Korea, January-February 1951$
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William T. Bowers

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125084

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125084.001.0001

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Holding the Chinese

Holding the Chinese

Chip'yong-ni and Wonju

Chapter:
(p.221) Chapter 9 Holding the Chinese
Source:
The Line
Author(s):
William T. Bowers
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125084.003.0009

While those who remained from Support Forces 7 and 21 and the 38th Infantry Regiment arrived at the new defensive line established above Wonju on February 13 1951, the Chinese were able to surround the 23d Infantry Regiment at the main crossroads in Chip'yong-ni. General Almond planned to withdraw the forces to the Yoju area since the 23d Infantry was isolated through a twelve-mile gap from other UN forces. Since General Ridgway entertained the idea of how the enemy could pose threats on the UN position upon withdrawal of the 23d Infantry at Chip'yong-ni, the 23d Infantry was ordered on hold while the 6th ROK Division as well as the British 27th Brigade were tasked to reinforce X Corps and to link X Corps's left flank. Although it was believed that the initial attack would fall at Wonju, it occurred in Chip'yong-ni and was succeeded by several other attacks.

Keywords:   support forces, Chip'yong-ni, Wonju, 23d Infantry, 6th ROK Division, British 27th Brigade

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