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Freedom's Main LineThe Journey of Reconciliation and the Freedom Rides$
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Derek Charles Catsam

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125114

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125114.001.0001

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Erasing the Badge of Inferiority

Erasing the Badge of Inferiority

Segregated Interstate Transport on the Ground and in the Courts, 1941–1960

Chapter:
(p.46) (p.47) Chapter 2 Erasing the Badge of Inferiority
Source:
Freedom's Main Line
Author(s):

DEREK CHARLES CATSAM

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125114.003.0004

While the years before Irene Morgan's arrest had seen a multitude of significant cases come to light, the succeeding years saw the interaction of local, state, and national level court decisions after various activist attempts that challenged Jim Crow transportation. Although the courts required litigants to be present in court, they were often found to be absent in the celebration of court decisions. With respect to Irene Morgan, George Houser, one of the Journey of Reconciliation's initiators, suggested that focus should not be given to other court opinions aside from the decision on the Morgan case, and that the Journey utilized this Court decision as back up to their direct action program. This chapter reveals some of the subsequent cases that raised further questions regarding the movement towards reconciliation.

Keywords:   Irene Morgan, Morgan case, George Houser, Court decision, Jim Crow, Journey of Reconciliation

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