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Freedom's Main LineThe Journey of Reconciliation and the Freedom Rides$
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Derek Charles Catsam

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125114

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125114.001.0001

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“Blazing Hell”

“Blazing Hell”

From Georgia into Alabama

Chapter:
(p.134) (p.135) Chapter 6 “Blazing Hell”
Source:
Freedom's Main Line
Author(s):

DEREK CHARLES CATSAM

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125114.003.0008

Although the Freedom Riders continued to sing freedom songs, the experiences of South Carolina revealed that the stakes had been raised for them as the movement furthered on towards the Deep South. On May 12, of that year, the group boarded buses for Georgia where they would be able to conduct tests in Augusta as well as facilitate meetings in Atlanta. It is important to note that Georgia had a disproportionately distributed power base, especially in rural areas. Through the 1940s, the state had been dominated by the Democratic Party and family demagoguery and by the 1960s it was marked by factionalism. The group then moved on towards Alabama, at which point it was believed that the group would not be able to return. This was because Alabama could be described as an area which fostered disdain for authority as well as having a strong spirit of rebellion.

Keywords:   Deep South, Atlanta, Democratic Party, family demagoguery, Alabama, rebellion

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