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Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South$
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Melba Porter Hay

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125329

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125329.001.0001

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“Our hope lies in the children”1901–1904

“Our hope lies in the children”1901–1904

Chapter:
(p.72) Chapter 4“Our hope lies in the children”1901–1904
Source:
Madeline McDowell Breckinridge and the Battle for a New South
Author(s):

Melba Porter Hay

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125329.003.0004

Madeline began to build upon many of the ideas that she had already developed and publicized in the Herald. In most instances she worked with one of the newly formed organizations: the Civic League, the Associated Charities, or the Woman's Club of Kentucky. The reforms that Madeline promoted through these groups ranged from the founding of parks, playgrounds, and kindergartens to attempts to persuade officials to include manual training in schools and to secure the passage of compulsory education, a juvenile court, and child labor laws. The passing of Colonel Breckinridge marked the end of an era for Madeline and Desha and in the coming years, they would use the pages of the Herald even more forcefully for progressive reforms.

Keywords:   Herald, Civic League, Associated Charities, Kentucky, education, juvenile court, child labor, Colonel Breckinridge, progressive reforms

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