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Consumed by WarEuropean Conflict in the 20th Century$
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Richard C. Hall

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125589

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125589.001.0001

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Germany Resurgent

Germany Resurgent

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter 7 Germany Resurgent
Source:
Consumed by War
Author(s):

Richard C. Hall

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125589.003.0007

The general truce held until 1933. It ended with the appointment of Adolf Hitler as German chancellor on January 30, 1933. Hitler advocated not merely the revision of the peace settlement but its utter destruction. He urged that Germany dominate Europe even beyond the position of power attained before 1914. This idea undoubtedly found support among most of the German people, because regardless of whether they sought European domination, most Germans supported the peace settlement revision. Hitler also expanded the German military. In March 1935, he ordered the reinstatement of conscription and the repudiation of all other military aspects of the Treaty of Versailles. Germany began the process of restoring its military power, based on the preparations begun by the German army in 1919.

Keywords:   Adolf Hitler, Germany, European domination, peace settlement, revision, conscription, Treaty of Versailles, army, military power

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