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Cowboy ConservatismTexas and the Rise of the Modern Right$
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Sean P. Cunningham

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125763

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125763.001.0001

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Reconstructing Conservatism

Reconstructing Conservatism

Antiliberalism and the Limits of “Law and Order”

Chapter:
(p.68) Chapter 3 Reconstructing Conservatism
Source:
Cowboy Conservatism
Author(s):

Sean P. Cunningham

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125763.003.0004

Ben Carpenter, president of the conservative Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, delivered a speech at the organization's annual membership convention on March 26, 1968. He compared America's decline to the dissolution of “the great political force which had held the civilized world together for more than 500 years.” Carpenter warned of rising crime rates, particularly rampant rape, and said that regardless of the “liberal” perspective, America had not always been “that way.” The hypermasculine posturing of men like Carpenter also grew out of notions of white southern honor and the impulse to protect family, home, and tradition against “invasion.”

Keywords:   dissolution, Carpenter, liberal, hypermasculine, invasion

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