Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cowboy ConservatismTexas and the Rise of the Modern Right$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sean P. Cunningham

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813125763

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813125763.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use (for details see http://www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 January 2018

Revolution

Revolution

Reagan and Texas in 1980

Chapter:
(p.209) Chapter 8 Revolution
Source:
Cowboy Conservatism
Author(s):

Sean P. Cunningham

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813125763.003.0009

The 1980s election of Ronald Reagan highlighted by his overwhelming win in Texas was a culmination of more than two decades of political change, hastened by a host of economic, social, and demographic forces. With Texas grassroots enthusiasm for Republican conservatism at an all-time high, and Carter's unpopularity crushing Democratic credibility at the national level, the state's political loyalties and traditions quickly began to change. The potency of negatively associating Carter with liberalism was further highlighted by the visibility of economic and foreign policy failures. The more Carter was associated with failure, the more failure was associated with liberalism, and liberalism was circularly associated with the Democratic Party.

Keywords:   demographic forces, enthusiasm, credibility, potency, liberalism

Kentucky Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .