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BuzzThe Life and Art of Busby Berkeley$

Jeffrey Spivak

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813126432

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813126432.001.0001

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(p.302) (p.303) Appendix: The Works of Busby Berkeley

(p.302) (p.303) Appendix: The Works of Busby Berkeley

Source:
Buzz
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky

Stage Works

The information about Busby Berkeley’s stage work was gathered from Berkeley’s memoirs; Tony Thomas and Jim Terry, with Busby Berkeley, The Busby Berkeley Book (Greenwich, Conn.: New York Graphic Society, 1973); Martin Rubin, Showstoppers: Busby Berkeley and the Tradition of Spectacle (New York: Columbia University Press, 1993); and assorted Playbills and similar theater handouts.

Circa 1919

THE MAN WHO CAME BACK

A drama by Jules Eckert Goodman. Buzz played an unidentified dramatic role in the out-of-town production that ran for a year.

Circa 1921

IRENE

A musical comedy in two acts. MUSIC: Harry Tierney. BOOK: James Montgomery. LYRICS: Joseph McCarthy. Buzz played the role of Madame Lucy.

Circa 1922

PINWHEEL REVEL

An exploration of the dance. DESIGNER AND DIRECTOR: Michio Itow. STAGE MANAGER: Busby Berkeley. Buzz also appeared as an actor.

1923

THE GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES

A revue in two acts. STAGE DIRECTOR: Busby Berkeley.

HITCHY KOO 1923

A musical revue. Buzz starred in the touring version and was director and performer.

(p.304) Circa 1924

MARY

A musical in two acts. ARLINGTON SQUARE THEATER, Boston. MUSIC: Louis A. Hirsch. BOOK: Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. LYRICS: Otto Harbach. DIRECTOR: Busby Berkeley.

HOLKA POLKA

A musical in three acts. LYRIC THEATRE, New York, N.Y., October 14–October 31 (21 performances). PRODUCER: Carl Reed. MUSIC: Will Ortman. BOOK: W. Walzer. ADAPTATION: Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. TRANSLATOR: Derick Wulff. LYRICS: Gus Kahn and Raymond B. Egan. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Max Steiner. STAGING: Oscar Eagle. DANCES AND ENSEMBLES: Busby Berkeley. ENTIRE PRODUCTION AND COSTUME DESIGNER: Livingston Platt.

GOING UP

A musical comedy in three acts. Circa October. MUSIC: Louis A. Hirsch. BOOK AND LYRICS: Otto Harbach and James Montgomery. Buzz directed for the Somerville Theater Stock Company when it played in Fitchburg, Mass.

CASTLES IN THE AIR

A musical play. SHUBERT OLYMPIC THEATRE, Chicago, opened November 22. After nearly a year, one unit from Chicago went to Broadway at the SELWYN THEATRE on September 6, 1926 (160 performances in New York). PRODUCERS: John Meehan and James W. Elliott. MUSIC: Percy Wenrich. LYRICS AND BOOK: Raymond W. Peck. STAGING: John Meehan. ENSEMBLES: Busby Berkeley (listed only for the Chicago run). DANCES: John Boyle. SCENERY: Rothe Studios.

1926

THE WILD ROSE

A musical in two acts. MARTIN BECK THEATRE, New York, N.Y., October 20–December 11 (61 performances). PRODUCER: Arthur Hammerstein. BOOK: Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II. LYRICS: Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II. MUSIC: Rudolf Friml. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Herbert Stothart. ASSISTANT MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Mario Agnolucci. STAGING: William J. Wilson. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley. SCENIC DESIGN: Josef Urban. COSTUME DESIGN: Mark Mooring.

(p.305) SWEET LADY

A musical comedy in three acts. December 1926–March 1927 (closed after a series of out-of-town tryouts). PRODUCER: Thomas Ball. MUSIC: Delos Owen and Thomas Ball. LYRICS: Bud Green. BOOK: Mann Page and Jack McGowan. DIRECTOR AND STAGING: William Caryl. MUSICAL NUMBER AND DANCE STAGING: Busby Berkeley.

1927

LADY DO

A musical in a prologue and two acts. Liberty Theatre, New York, N.Y., April 18–June 4 (56 performances). PRODUCER: Frank L. Teller. MUSIC: Abel Baer. BOOK: Jack McClellan and Albert Cowles. LYRICS: Sam M. Lewis and Joseph Young. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Frank E. Barry. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Louis Gress. DIRECTOR OF ORCHESTRA: Frank E. Barry. PRODUCTION REVISION AND STAGING: Edgar J. MacGregor. DANCE AND ENSEMBLE STAGING: Busby Berkeley. COSTUME DESIGN: Karyl Norman and Ellis Porter. SCENIC DESIGN: Louis Kennel and Gus Wimazal.

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE

A musical in two acts adapted from the work of Mark Twain. Vanderbilt Theatre, New York, N.Y., November 3, 1927–October 27, 1928 (421 performances). PRODUCERS: Lew Fields and Lyle Andrews. MUSIC: Richard Rodgers. BOOK: Herbert Fields. LYRICS: Lorenz Hart: MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Paul Parnell. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Roy Webb. DANCES: Busby Berkeley. STAGING: Alexander Leftwich. SCENIC DESIGN: John Hawkins and John F. Hawkins Jr. COSTUME DESIGN: John F. Hawkins Jr. COMPANY MANAGER: Harry B. Nelmes. STAGE MANAGER: Murray Jay Queen. ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER: John Creighton. ART DIRECTOR: Herbert Ward.

THE WHITE EAGLE

A musical play in a prologue and three acts. Casino Theatre, New York, N.Y., December 26, 1927–February 4, 1928 (48 performances). PRODUCER: Russell Janney. MUSIC: Rudolf Friml. BOOK: Brian Hooker and William H. Post. LYRICS: Brian Hooker and William H. Post. Adapted from the play The Squaw Man by Edwin Milton Royle. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Anton Heindl. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Joseph Majer. STAGING: Richard Boleslavsky. CHOREOGRAPHER: Busby Berkeley. DIRECTORS: Russell Janney and Olga Treskoff. SCENIC DESIGN: James Reynolds. COSTUME DESIGN: James Reynolds. LIGHTING DESIGN: Ray Barnet.

(p.306) 1928

THE LITTLE SPITFIRE

A play in three acts by Myron C. Fagan. A production of THE BUSBY BERKELEY PLAYERS in Plainfield, N.J. Buzz acted in and directed the production.

PRESENT ARMS

A musical in two acts. LEW FIELDS’ MANSFIELD THEATRE, New York, N.Y., April 26–September 1 (155 performances). PRODUCER: Lew M. Fields. MUSIC: Richard Rodgers. LYRICS: Lorenz Hart. BOOK: Herbert Fields. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Roy Webb. STAGING: Alexander Leftwich. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley. SCENIC DESIGN: Herbert Ward. COSTUME DESIGN: Milgrims.

EARL CARROLL VANITIES[Seventh Edition]

A revue in two acts. EARL CARROLL THEATRE, New York, N.Y., August 6, 1928–February 2, 1929 (200 performances). PRODUCER: Earl Carroll. LYRICS: Grace Henry. MUSIC: Morris Hamilton. BOOK: W. C. Fields, Paul Gerard Smith, Joe Frisco, Robert T. Tarrant, and Herman Meyer. ADDITIONAL MUSIC: George Bagby, G. Romilli, Michael H. Cleary, George Whiting, Louis Alter, Mario Savino, Jesse Greer, Ernie Golden, and Abner Silver. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Ray Kavanaugh. ADDITIONAL LYRICS: Paul Jones, Ned Washington, Joe Burke, Raymond Klages, Ernie Golden, Jack LeSoir, and Roy Doll. DIRECTOR: Earl Carroll. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley. STAGING: Edgar J. MacGregor. MACHINERY BALLET created and staged by the Marmein Sisters. SCENIC DESIGN: Hugh Willoughby. COSTUME DESIGN: Mabel E. Johnston and William H. Matthews. ART AND TECHNICAL DIRECTION: Bernard Lohmuller.

GOOD BOY

A musical in two acts. Hammerstein’s Theatre, New York, N.Y., September 5, 1928–April 13, 1929 (253 performances). PRODUCER: Arthur Hammerstein. MUSIC: Herbert P. Stothart. BOOK: Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Henry Myers. LYRICS: Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Herbert P. Stothart. DIRECTOR: Reginald Hammerstein. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley. SCENIC DESIGN: John Wenger. COSTUME DESIGN: Mark Mooring. MECHANICAL AND TREADMILL EFFECTS: Peter Clark, Inc. and Edward Dolan.

RAINBOW

A musical in two acts. GALLO OPERA HOUSE, New York, N.Y., November 21–December 15 (29 performances). PRODUCER: Philip Goodman. BOOK: Laurence Stallings and Oscar Hammerstein II. LYRICS: Oscar Hammerstein (p.307) II. MUSIC: Vincent Youmans. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Max Steiner. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Max Steiner. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley. STAGING: Oscar Hammerstein II. PRODUCTION SUPERVISION: Philip Goodman. SCENIC DESIGN: Frank E. Gates and Edward A. Morange. COSTUME DESIGN: Charles LeMaire. RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL DIRECTOR: Leighton K. Brill.

HELLO, DADDY!

A musical in two acts based on a farce adapted from the German by Frank Man-del. LEW FIELDS’ MANSFIELD THEATRE, New York, N.Y., December 26, 1928–January 1929. GEORGE M. COHAN’S THEATRE, New York, N.Y., January 21, 1929–May 1929. ERLANGER’S THEATRE, New York, N.Y., May 6, 1929–June 15, 1929 (198 performances). PRODUCER: Lew M. Fields. BOOK: Herbert Fields. LYRICS: Dorothy Fields. MUSIC: Jimmy McHugh. PRINCIPAL DANCE ROUTINES: Buddy Bradley. HARMONY ARRANGEMENTS OF THE GIERSDORF SISTERS’ SONGS: Arthur Johnston. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Maurice De Packh, Stephen Jones, Fod Livingston, and Hans Spialek. STAGING OF MUSICAL NUMBERS: Busby Berkeley. STAGING OF BOOK: Alexander Leftwich. SUPERVISION OF ENTIRE PROJECT: John Murray Anderson. SCENIC DESIGN: Hermann Rosse. COSTUME DESIGN: Charles Le Maire.

1929

PLEASURE BOUND

A revue in two acts. MAJESTIC THEATRE, New York, N.Y., February 18–June 15 (136 performances). PRODUCERS: Lee and J. J. Shubert. MUSIC: Muriel Pollock. BOOK: Harold Atteridge. LYRICS: Max Leif, Nathaniel Lief, and Harold Atteridge. ADDITIONAL MUSIC: Phil Baker, Maurice Rubens, and Peter DeRose. ADDITIONAL LYRICS: Moe Jaffe, Sid Silvers, Charles Tobias, Irving Kahal, and Sidney Clare. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Harold Stern. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Emil Gerstenberger and Archey Bleyer. STAGING: Lew Morton. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley and John Boyle. SCENIC DESIGN: Watson Barratt. COSTUME DESIGN: Ernest Schrapps.

A NIGHT IN VENICE

A revue in two acts. SHUBERT THEATRE, New York, N.Y., May 21–circa September. MAJESTIC THEATRE, September 16–October 19 (175 performances). PRODUCERS: Lee and J. J. Shubert. MUSIC: Lee Davis and Maury Rubens. LYRICS: J. Keirn Brennan and Moe Jaffe. FEATURING SONGS by Vincent Youmans. ADDITIONAL ORCHESTRATIONS: Vincent Youmans. FEATURING SONGS with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Max Meth. DIRECTORS: Lew Morton and Thomas A. Hart. (p.308) CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley and Chester Hale. SCENIC DESIGN: Watson Barratt. COSTUME DESIGN: Erté, George Barbier, and Ernest Schrapps.

BROADWAY NIGHTS

A revue in twenty-four scenes. 44th STREET THEATRE, New York, N.Y., July 15–August 17 (40 performances). PRODUCERS: Lee and J. J. Shubert. MUSIC: Sam Timberg, Lee David, and Maurice Rubens. LYRICS: Moe Jaffe. BOOK: Edgar Smith. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: John McManus. FEATURING SONGS by J. Fred Coots, Ralph Erwin, and Phil Svigals. FEATURING SONGS with lyrics by J. Keirn Brennan, Sam M. Lewis, Joe Young, and Clifford Grey. DIRECTOR: Stanley Logan. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley and Chester Hale. SCENIC DESIGN: Watson Barratt. COSTUME DESIGN: George Bar-bier and Ernest Schrapps.

THE STREET SINGER

A musical in two acts. SHUBERT THEATRE, New York, N.Y., September 17, 1929–February 1930. ROYALE THEATRE, New York, N.Y., February 17, 1930–March 7, 1930 (191 performances). PRODUCER AND DIRECTOR: Busby Berkeley. MUSIC: John Gilbert, Nicholas Kempner, and Sam Timberg. BOOK: Cyrus Wood and Edgar Smith. LYRICS: Graham John. FEATURING SONGS by Richard Meyers with lyrics by Edward Eliscu. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Pierre De Reeder. SCENIC DESIGN: Watson Barratt. COSTUME DESIGN: Orry-Kelly and George Barbier.

THE DUCHESS OF CHICAGO

A blend of operetta and musical comedy. November 1929–December 1929. Closed after tryouts in Springfield, Newark, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Boston. PRODUCERS: Lee and J. J. Shubert. MUSIC: Emmerich Kalman. LYRICS: Edward Eliscu. ADDITIONAL NUMBERS: Maurice Rubens and Sam Timberg. BOOK: Julius Brammer and Alfred Gruenwald. DIRECTOR OF DIALOGUE: Stanley Logan. STAGING: Busby Berkeley.

1930

RUTH SELWYN’S NINE FIFTEEN REVUE

GEORGE M. COHAN’S THEATRE, New York, N.Y., February 11–15 (7 performances). PRODUCER: Ruth Selwyn. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley and Leon Leonidoff. STAGING: Alexander Leftwich.

LEW LESLIE’S INTERNATIONAL REVUE

A revue in two parts. MAJESTIC THEATRE, New York, N.Y., February 25–May 17 (95 performances). PRODUCER: Lew Leslie. MUSIC: Dorothy (p.309) Fields and Jimmy McHugh. BOOK: Nat N. Dorfman and Lew Leslie. LYRICS: Dorothy Fields and Jimmy McHugh. DIRECTORS: Lew Leslie and E. C. Lilley. CHOREOGRAPHY: Busby Berkeley and Harry Crosley.

NINA ROSA

A musical play. MAJESTIC THEATRE, New York, N.Y., September 20, 1930–January 17, 1931 (137 performances). BOOK: Otto Harbach. MUSIC: Sigmund Romberg. LYRICS: Irving Caesar. PRODUCERS: Lee and J. J. Shubert. STAGING OF ENTIRE PRODUCTION: J. C. Huffman.

NOTE: Buzz commented to authors Tony Thomas and Jim Terry (The Busby Berkeley Book) that he worked on this show. Author Martin Rubin (Showstoppers) writes that Berkeley’s name was not seen in the program when Nina Rosa opened on Broadway, nor was Buzz named in any New York review. Rubin surmised that a possible falling out had occurred between Buzz and the Messrs. Shubert prior to the Broadway opening. The sheet music for one of the songs (“Your Smiles, Your Tears”) does list “Dances by Busby Berkeley.”

SWEET AND LOW

A revue in two acts. CHANIN’s 46TH STREET THEATRE, New York, N.Y., November 17, 1930–April 1931 (184 performances). PRODUCER: Billy Rose. SKETCHES: David Freedman. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: William Daly. FEATURING SONGS by Harry Archer, Oscar Levant, Charlotte Kent, Harry Warren, Vivian Ellis, William C. K. Irwin, Louis Alter, George M. Cohan, Dana Suesse, Phil Charig, and Joseph Meyer. FEATURING SONGS with lyrics by Edward Eliscu, Ira Gershwin, Billy Rose, Malcolm McComb, and Ballard McDonald. CHOREOGRAPHY: Danny Dare. ADDITIONAL DANCES: Busby Berkeley. STAGING: Alexander Leftwich. SCENIC DESIGN: Jo Mielziner. COSTUME DESIGN: James Reynolds.

1944

GLAD TO SEE YOU

A musical comedy in two acts. SHUBERT THEATRE, Philadelphia, November. PRODUCER: David Wolper. MUSIC: Jule Styne. LYRICS: Sammy Cahn. BOOK: Fred Thompson and Eddie Davis. STAGING AND DIRECTION OF ENTIRE PRODUCTION: Busby Berkeley. DANCES AND ENSEMBLES: Valerie Bettis. SETTINGS AND LIGHTING DESIGN: Howard Bay. COSTUME DESIGN: Travis Banton.

NOTE: The show attempted an eventual Broadway run but folded after out-oftown tryouts in Philadelphia and Boston. Buzz left the show after the Philadelphia run.

(p.310) 1971

NO, NO, NANETTE

A musical in three acts. Revival originally conceived for production by Harry Rigby. 46TH STREET THEATRE, New York, N.Y., preview January 6, 1971; January 19, 1971–February 3, 1973 (13 previews; 861 performances). PRODUCER: Pyxidium, Ltd. MUSIC: Vincent Youmans. LYRICS: Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach. BOOK: Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. BOOK ADAPTATION: Burt Shevelove. MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Buster Davis. VOCAL ARRANGEMENTS: Buster Davis. MUSIC ORCHESTRATION: Ralph Burns. DANCE ARRANGEMENTS: Luther Henderson. INCIDENTAL MUSIC: Luther Henderson. PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR: Busby Berkeley. DIRECTOR: Burt Shevelove. MUSICAL STAGING: Donald Saddler. CHOREOGRAPHY: Donald Saddler. PRODUCTION DESIGN: Raoul Pène Du Bois. LIGHTING DESIGN: Jules Fisher. SOUND DESIGN: Jack Shearing. PRINCIPALS’ COIFFURES: Vidal Sassoon. BERKELEY GIRLS’ COIFFURES: Bruce Steier. SCENIC ASSISTANT: Mason Arvold. COSTUME ASSISTANT: David Toser. GENERAL MANAGER: Gatchell & Neufeld, Ltd. ASSISTANT COMPANY MANAGER: James Mennen. PRODUCTION MANAGER: May Muth. STAGE MANAGER: Robert Schear. ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER: John H. Lowe III. AT THE TWIN PIANOS: Colston and Clements. COPYIST: Lilette Hindin. MUSIC CONTRACTOR: Morris Stonzek: ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR: Charles Coleman: MUSIC CONSULTANT: Robert Lissauer.

Film Works

The credit Berkeley received is displayed in italics. Sources for the short synopses are the author and the American Film Institute Database. The musical numbers listed are those Berkeley worked on. Some films had songs that were filmed by others; for example, “I’ve Got To Sing a Torch Song” (music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin), featured in Gold Diggers of 1933, was not filmed by Berkeley.

1930

WHOOPEE!

STUDIO: Goldwyn/United Artists. CREDIT: Dances and ensembles staged by.

SYNOPSIS: Western sheriff Bob Wells is preparing to marry Sally Morgan; she loves part-Indian Wanenis, whose race is an obstacle.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Makin’ Whoopee”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Gus Kahn

“My Baby Just Cares for Me”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Gus Kahn

“The Song of the Setting Sun”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics Gus Kahn

“Cowboys”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Gus Kahn

(p.311) “A Girl Friend of a Boy Friend of Mine”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Gus Kahn

“Stetson”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Gus Kahn

1931

KIKI

STUDIO: United Artists. CREDIT: Dances staged by.

SYNOPSIS: A scheming, high-spirited chorus girl gets between her boss and his wife.

PALMY DAYS

STUDIO: Goldwyn/United Artists. CREDIT: Dances and ensembles by.

SYNOPSIS: Musical comedy antics in an art deco bakery with Eddie Cantor as an assistant to a phony psychic.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Bend Down, Sister”: Music by Con Conrad; lyrics by Ballard MacDonald and David Silverstein

“Yes, Yes (My Baby Said Yes, Yes)”: Music and lyrics by Con Conrad and Cliff Friend

“Dunk Dunk Dunk”: Music by Con Conrad; lyrics by Ballard MacDonald

NOTE: Buzz can also be seen as a nonspeaking extra in the early fake séance scene.

FLYING HIGH

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Dances created by.

SYNOPSIS: A harebrained inventor invents a new flying machine but can’t figure out how to land it.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“I’ll Make a Happy Landing (the Lucky Day I Land You)”: Music by Jimmy McHugh; lyrics by Dorothy Fields

“We’ll Dance until the Dawn”: Music by Jimmy McHugh; lyrics by Dorothy Fields

“It’ll Be the First Time for Me”: Music by Jimmy McHugh; lyrics by Dorothy Fields

1932

SKY DEVILS

STUDIO: United Artists. CREDIT: Dance director.

SYNOPSIS: Wilkie and Mitchell, trying to desert their draft into the army, stow away on a ship that takes them into the war zone. While AWOL, the rivals for Mary’s affections accidently destroy an ammunition dump.

(p.312) NIGHT WORLD

STUDIO: Universal. CREDIT: Dances staged by.

SYNOPSIS: “Happy” MacDonald and his unfaithful wife own a Prohibition-era nightclub. On this eventful night, he is threatened by bootleggers, and the club’s star dancer falls in love with a young socialite who drinks to forget a personal tragedy, among other incidents.

MUSICAL NUMBER:

“Who’s Your Little Who-Zis”: Music and lyrics by Ben Bernie

BIRD OF PARADISE

STUDIO: RKO. CREDIT: Uncredited native-dance director.

SYNOPSIS: An island visitor falls for a Polynesian beauty slated for sacrifice to the gods.

THE KID FROM SPAIN

STUDIO: Goldwyn/United Artists. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: An innocent man accused of robbing banks masquerades as a bullfighter to escape the police.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“But We Must Rise (The College Song)”: Music and lyrics by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar

“In the Moonlight”: Music and lyrics by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar

“Look What You’ve Done”: Music and lyrics by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar

“What a Perfect Combination”: Music and lyrics by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar

1933

42ND STREET

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. Credit: Dances and ensembles created and staged by.

SYNOPSIS: Julian Marsh, a successful Broadway director prone to nervous breakdowns and left virtually broke in the Depression, directs a new show, in spite of his doctor’s warnings. The show’s backing comes from a rich lecher who is in love with Dorothy Brock, the star of the show. But she doesn’t return his affection because she is still in love with her old partner. At the night before the premiere, Brock breaks her ankle, and one of the chorus girls, Peggy Sawyer, takes over her part, and goes out a “youngster” and comes back a “star.”

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Forty-Second Street”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“You’re Getting to Be a Habit with Me”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

(p.313) “Shuffle Off to Buffalo”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin “Young and Healthy”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

NOTE: The film mistakenly shows two copyright dates, 1933 (on the first title card) and 1932 (on “The End” title card). The film was released in 1933.

GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Barney Hopkins is producing a new show on Broadway, but the day before it opens, the set and costumes are confiscated due to unpaid bills. Three showgirls conspire to sweet-talk their way into getting backing for the show.

MUSICAL NUMBERS: “The Gold Diggers Song (We’re in the Money)”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin “Shadow Waltz”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin “Pettin’ in the Park”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin “Remember My Forgotten Man”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

NOTE: Buzz is seen briefly as the “call boy” ordering the dancers to ready themselves for the “Forgotten Man” number.

SHE HAD TO SAY YES

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by Busby Berkeley and George Amy.

SYNOPSIS: A secretary pads her salary by dating prospective buyers for her company.

FOOTLIGHT PARADE

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A producer of theater prologues fights labor problems, financiers, and his greedy ex-wife to put on a show.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Sitting on a Backyard Fence”: Music by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Irving Kahal

“Honeymoon Hotel”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“By a Waterfall”: Music by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Irving Kahal

“Shanghai Lil”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

NOTE: The Internet Movie Database incorrectly identifies Berkeley as playing an uncredited drug store clerk early in the film.

(p.314) ROMAN SCANDALS

STUDIO: Goldwyn/United Artists. CREDIT: Production numbers directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Eddie (Eddie Cantor) gets hit by a wagon and while unconscious he dreams he is in ancient Rome.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Build a Little Home”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“No More Love”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Keep Young and Beautiful”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Put a Tax on Love”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

1934

FASHIONS OF 1934

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A con artist and his beautiful assistant take on the fashion world.

MUSICAL NUMBER:

“Spin a Little Web of Dreams”: Music by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Irving Kahal

WONDER BAR

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: The denizens of a Parisian night club deal with murder and romance.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Don’t Say Goodnight”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Goin’ to Heaven on a Mule”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

DAMES

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Family members financially beholden to a stodgy rich uncle do their best to hide the fact from him that their daughter is the lead in a so-called scandalous Broadway show.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Dames”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“I Only Have Eyes for You”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“The Girl at the Ironing Board”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“When You Were a Smile on Your Mother’s Lips and a Twinkle in Your Daddy’s Eye”: Words and music by Irving Kahal and Sammy Fain

GOLD DIGGERS OF 1935

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by and Dances Created and Staged by.

(p.315) SYNOPSIS: A socialite is bamboozled into producing a charity stage show at the luxury hotel where she summers, while her daughter rejects her arranged marriage partner for the arms of a hotel employee.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“I’m Going Shopping with You”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Lullaby of Broadway”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“The Words Are in My Heart”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

IN CALIENTE

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: At a Mexican resort, a fast-talking magazine editor woos the dancer he’s trashed in print.

MUSICAL NUMBER:

“The Lady in Red”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

“In Caliente”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

“Muchacha”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

BRIGHT LIGHTS

STUDIO: First National/Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Husband-and-wife vaudeville stars separate when success goes to his head.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“She Was an Acrobat’s Daughter”: Lyrics by Bert Kalmar; music by Harry Ruby

“You’re an Eyeful of Heaven”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

“Nobody Cares If I’m Blue”: Music by Harry Akst; lyrics by Grant Clarke

I LIVE FOR LOVE

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A socialite tries to break into show business.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“I Live for Love”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

“Mine Alone”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

“A Man Must Shave”: Music by Allie Wrubel; lyrics by Mort Dixon

STARS OVER BROADWAY

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Numbers staged and directed by, sharing credit with Bobby Connolly.

SYNOPSIS: An aggressive agent turns a hotel porter into an overnight sensation.

MUSICAL NUMBER:

“At Your Service, Madame”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

(p.316) 1936

STAGE STRUCK

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Broadway hopefuls put on a show.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Fancy Meeting You”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

“In Your Own Quiet Way”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

THE SINGING KID

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Uncredited director of the numbers “You’re the Cure for What Ails Me” (Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg) and “My How This Town Has Changed” (Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg).

CHANGING OF THE GUARD

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Uncredited role as dance coach to actress Sybil Jason.

GOLD DIGGERS OF 1937

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A group of insurance salesmen try to get into show business.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“With Plenty of Money and You”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Life Insurance Song”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

“Speaking of the Weather”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

“Let’s Put Our Heads Together”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Har burg

“All’s Fair in Love and War”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

1937

THE GO GETTER

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A U.S. Navy veteran with one leg fights to make himself a success.

THE SINGING MARINE

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A young marine develops an inflated ego after winning a talent contest.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“The Song of the Marines”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

(p.317) “You Can’t Run Away from Love Tonight”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Night over Shanghai”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

VARSITY SHOW

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Finale created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A Broadway producer puts on a show at his alma mater.

MUSICAL NUMBERS INCLUDED IN THE FINALE:

“On with the Dance”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“You’ve Got Something There”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Have You Got Any Castles, Baby?”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Love Is on the Air Tonight”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Boola Boola”: Written by Allan M. Hirsh

“On, Wisconsin!”: Music by William T. Purdy and Carl D. Beck; lyrics by J. S. Hubbard and Charles D. Rosa

“Fight On”: Music by Milo Sweet; lyrics by Milo Sweet and Glen Grant

“The Notre Dame Victory March”: Music by Michael J. Shea; lyrics by John F. Shea

“The Maine Stein Song”: Music by Albert Sprague; lyrics by Lincoln Colcord

“Come Join the Band”: Composer unknown

“On, Brave Old Army Team”: Written by Philip Egner

“Anchors Aweigh”: Music by Charles A. Zimmerman; lyrics by Alfred Hart Miles and R. Lovell

“Old King Cole”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

1938

HOLLYWOOD HOTEL

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A small-town boy wins a Hollywood talent contest.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Hooray for Hollywood”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Sing, You Son of a Gun”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“I’m Like a Fish out of Water”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Silhouetted in the Moonlight”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“Let That Be a Lesson to You”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

“I’ve Hitched My Wagon to a Star”: Music by Richard Whiting; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

(p.318) GOLD DIGGERS IN PARIS

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Three showgirls travel to Paris in search of rich husbands.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“I Wanna Go Back to Bali”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“A Stranger in Paree”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“The Latin Quarter”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin

“Daydreaming (All Night Long)”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Johnny Mercer

MEN ARE SUCH FOOLS

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: An ambitious secretary uses the men in her life to turn herself into a radio star.

GARDEN OF THE MOON

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A nightclub owner and a bandleader compete for the lead singer’s heart.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“The Lady on the Two Cent Stamp”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer

“Love Is Where You Find It”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer

“The Girl Friend of the Whirling Dervish”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer

“Confidentially”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer

COMET OVER BROADWAY

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A stage star’s rampant ambition leads to murder.

1939

THEY MADE ME A CRIMINAL

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A young boxer flees to farming country when he thinks he’s killed an opponent in the ring.

BROADWAY SERENADE

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Finale number created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Career conflicts threaten a singer’s marriage to a young composer.

(p.319) MUSICAL NUMBER:

“None but the Lonely Heart”: Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky; English lyrics by Gus Kahn

THE WIZARD OF OZ

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Uncredited for “If I Only Had a Brain” number (later deleted for the release). Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg.

BABES IN ARMS

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A group of second-generation entertainers puts on a show to launch their careers.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Babes in Arms”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“Where or When”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“Good Morning”: Music by Nacio Herb Brown; lyrics by Arthur Freed

“You Are My Lucky Star”: Music by Nacio Herb Brown; lyrics by Arthur Freed

“I Cried for You”: Written by Gus Arnheim, Abe Lyman, and Arthur Freed

“Daddy Was a Minstrel Man”: Written by Roger Edens

“God’s Country”: Music by Harold Arlen; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

FAST AND FURIOUS

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Married book-dealers Joel and Garda Sloane get mixed up with murder during a beauty pageant.

1940

BITTER SWEET

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Uncredited director for the final number “Zigeuner (The Gypsy)” written by Noel Coward.

FORTY LITTLE MOTHERS

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A teacher at an all-girls’ school stumbles on an abandoned baby.

STRIKE UP THE BAND

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A high-school band sets out to win a national radio contest.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Strike up the Band”: Music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Ira Gershwin

“Our Love Affair”: Music by Roger Edens; lyrics Arthur Freed

“Do the La Conga”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

(p.320) “Nobody”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

“The Gay Nineties”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

“Nell of New Rochelle”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

“Drummer Boy”: Words and music by Roger Edens

1941

BLONDE INSPIRATION

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A pulp-fiction writer tries to land a job with an unscrupulous publisher.

ZIEGFELD GIRL

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Three showgirls in the Ziegfeld Follies face romantic trials on their way to the top.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Minnie from Trinidad”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

“You Stepped out of a Dream”: Music by Nacio Herb Brown; lyrics by Gus Kahn

“Ziegfeld Girls”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

“You Gotta Pull Strings”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Harold Adamson

“Caribbean Love Song”: Music by Roger Edens; lyrics by Ralph Freed

“You Never Looked So Beautiful”: Music by Walter Donaldson; lyrics by Har old Adamson

LADY, BE GOOD!

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Married songwriters almost split up while putting on a big show.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Lady Be Good”: Music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Ira Gershwin

“The Last Time I Saw Paris”: Music by Jerome Kern; lyrics by Oscar Ham merstein II

“Fascinating Rhythm”: Music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Ira Gershwin

“Your Words and My Music”: Music by Roger Edens; lyrics by Arthur Freed

BABES ON BROADWAY

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Show-biz hopefuls stage a benefit for an orphanage.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Babes on Broadway”: Music by Burton Lane; lyrics by E. Y. Harburg

(p.321) “How About You?”: Music by Burton Lane; lyrics by Ralph Freed

“Anything Can Happen in New York”: Music by Burton Lane; lyrics by Ralph Freed

“Hoe Down”: Music by Roger Edens; lyrics by Ralph Freed

“Franklin D. Roosevelt Jones”: Music and lyrics by Harold Rome

“Waiting for the Robert E. Lee”: Music by Lewis F. Muir; lyrics by L. Wolfe Gilbert

“Bombshell from Brazil”: Music and lyrics by Roger Edens

BORN TO SING

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Finale

“Ballad for Americans” Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Fledgling entertainers put on a show for Uncle Sam.

MUSICAL NUMBER:

“Ballad for Americans”: Music by Earl Robinson; lyrics by John Latouche

CALLING ALL GIRLS

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A short compilation film featuring Buzz’s classic numbers: “Don’t Say Goodnight,” “Lullaby of Broadway,” “Shadow Waltz,” “By a Waterfall,” and “Shanghai Lil.”

FOR ME AND MY GAL

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: An unscrupulous song-and-dance man uses his partner and his best friend to get ahead.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“For Me and My Gal”: Music by George W. Meyer; lyrics by Edgar Leslie and E. Ray Goetz

“Ballin’ the Jack”: Music by Chris Smith; lyrics by Jim Burris

“When You Wore a Tulip and I Wore a Big Red Rose”: Music by Percy Wenrich; lyrics by Jack Mahoney

1943

CABIN IN THE SKY

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Uncredited director for the number “Shine.” Music by Ford Dabney; lyrics by Cecil Mack.

GIRL CRAZY

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT:

“I Got Rhythm” Number Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A womanizing playboy finds true love when he’s sent to a desert college.

(p.322) MUSICAL NUMBER:

“I Got Rhythm”: Music by George Gershwin; lyrics by Ira Gershwin

THE GANG’S ALL HERE

STUDIO: 20th Century Fox. CREDIT: Directed by and dances created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Playboy Andy Mason, on leave from the army, romances showgirl Eadie Allen overnight to such effect that she’s starry-eyed when he leaves the next morning.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Brazil”: Music by Ary Barroso; English lyrics by S. K. Russell

“You Discover You’re in New York”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

“The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

“A Journey to a Star”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

“No Love, No Nothin’”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

“Paducah”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

“The Polka Dot Polka”: Music by Harry Warren; lyrics by Leo Robin

1946

CINDERELLA JONES

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A woman can claim inheritance only if she marries a genius.

1948

ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A singer on a Caribbean cruise gets mixed up in a series of romantic problems.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“It’s Magic”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

“The Tourist Trade”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

“Brazilian Rhapsody” aka

“Cuban Rhapsody”: Music by Jule Styne, Ray Hein dorf, and Oscar Levant

“Put ’em in a Box, Tie ’em with a Ribbon and Throw ’em in the Deep Blue Sea”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

“It’s You or No One”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

“I’m in Love”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

“Run, Run, Run”: Music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Sammy Cahn

(p.323) 1949

TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A beautiful woman takes over a turn-of-the-century baseball team. Musical numbers were staged by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen.

1950

TWO WEEKS WITH LOVE

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers staged by.

SYNOPSIS: Two sisters find romance during a turn-of-the-century family vacation.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Aba Daba Honeymoon”: Music by Walter Donovan; lyrics by Arthur Fields

“My Hero”: Music by Oscar Straus; lyrics by Hugh Stanislaus Stange

“Row, Row, Row”: Music by James V. Monaco; lyrics by William Jerome

“A Heart That’s Free”: Music by Alfred G. Robyn; lyrics by Thomas Railey

1951

CALL ME MISTER

STUDIO: 20th Century Fox. CREDIT: Dances staged by.

SYNOPSIS: G.I. Sergeant Shep Dooley, former stage star awaiting discharge in postwar Tokyo, meets his estranged love Kay when she arrives to entertain the troops.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Japanese Girl Like ’Merican Boy”: Music by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Mack Gordon

“I’m Gonna Love That Guy (Like He’s Never Been Loved Before)”: Written by Frances Ash

“Lament to the Pots and Pans”: Written by Earl K. Brent; lyrics by Jerry Seelen

“Going Home Train”: Written by Harold Rome

“I Just Can’t Do Enough for You, Baby”: Written by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Mack Gordon

“Military Life”: Written by Harold Rome; revised lyrics by Jerry Seelen

“Love Is Back in Business”: Written by Sammy Fain; lyrics by Mack Gordon

THE BLUE VEIL

STUDIO: RKO. CREDIT: Uncredited dance director. MUSICAL NUMBER:

“Daddy”: Written by Bobby Troup

(p.324) TWO TICKETS TO BROADWAY

STUDIO: RKO. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: A small-town girl finds love on the road to Broadway stardom.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“The Worry Bird”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“Big Chief Hole-in-the-Ground”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“The Closer You Are”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“Baby, You’ll Never Be Sorry”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“Pelican Falls”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“Are You a Beautiful Dream?”: Written by Jule Styne and Leo Robin

“Let’s Make Comparisons”: Written by Sammy Cahn and Bob Crosby

“There’s No Tomorrow”: Written by Al Hoffman, Leo Corday, and Leon Carr

“Prologue from ‘Pagliacci’”: Written by Leoncavallo

“Manhattan”: Written by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart

1952

MILLION DOLLAR MERMAID

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Fountain and smoke numbers staged by.

SYNOPSIS: The story of Annette Kellerman, the world’s first great swimming star. Music orchestrated by Alexander Courage.

1953

SMALL TOWN GIRL

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers staged by.

SYNOPSIS: A sheriff’s daughter falls for a playboy arrested for speeding.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“I’ve Gotta Hear That Beat”: Music by Nicholas Brodszky; lyrics by Leo Robin

“Take Me to Broadway”: Music by Nicholas Brodszky; lyrics by Leo Robin

“Fine, Fine, Fine”: Music by Nicholas Brodszky; lyrics by Leo Robin

“My Gaucho”: Music by Nicholas Brodszky; lyrics by Leo Robin

“The Fellow I Follow”: Music by Nicholas Brodszky; lyrics by Leo Robin

NOTE: André Previn composed the instrumental track that plays during Bobby Van’s

“Street Dance” number.

EASY TO LOVE

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers created and directed by.

SYNOPSIS: Two men vie for the heart of a Cypress Gardens swimming star.

(p.325) MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Easy to Love”: Music and lyrics by Cole Porter

“Spring, Beautiful Spring (O Frühling, wie bist du so schön)”: Written by Paul Lincke

“Look Out! I’m Romantic”: Music by Vic Mizzy; lyrics by Mann Curtis

“Didja Ever”: Music by Vic Mizzy; lyrics by Mann Curtis

“Coquette”: Music and lyrics by Gus Kahn, Carmen Lombardo, and Johnny Green

“That’s What a Rainy Day Is For”: Music by Vic Mizzy; lyrics by Mann Curtis

1954

ROSE MARIE

STUDIO: MGM. CREDIT: Musical numbers staged by.

SYNOPSIS: A trapper’s daughter is torn between the Mountie who wants to civilize her and a dashing prospector.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“The Right Place for a Girl”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Paul Francis Webster

“Mounties”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II

“Free to Be Free”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Paul Francis Webster

“Rose Marie”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II

“I’m A Mountie Who Never Got His Man”: Music by George Stoll; lyrics by George Stoll and Herbert Baker

“Indian Love Call”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II

“I Have the Love”: Music by Rudolf Friml; lyrics by Paul Francis Webster

“Totem Tom-Tom”: Music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart; lyrics by Otto A. Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II

1954–1955

BIG TOWN

Television series. CREDIT: Directed by.

NOTE: The Internet Movie Database credits Berkeley with directing four episodes of the police drama. One, “The Lovers,” was discovered and screened for this book. The copyright was 1954, and the database shows it aired on February 14, 1955. Note also that the episodes did not reveal their titles. Other unconfirmed episodes include “Boys Week” (air date December 27, 1954); “The Airplane Story” (air date January 10, 1955); and “The School Teacher” (air date January 17, 1955).

(p.326) JUMBO (aka BILLY ROSE’S JUMBO)

STUDIO: MGM: CREDIT: Second unit director.

SYNOPSIS: Pop and Kitty Wonder are the owners of the Wonder Circus. Because of Pop’s addiction to gambling, they are constantly in debt and the creditors are ready to foreclose. Meanwhile the circus’s star attraction, an elephant named Jumbo, is desired by a rival circus owner.

MUSICAL NUMBERS:

“Over and Over Again”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“Little Girl Blue”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“The Most Beautiful Girl in the World”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“Circus on Parade”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“Why Can’t I?”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

“This Can’t Be Love”: Music by Richard Rodgers; lyrics by Lorenz Hart

1970

THE PHYNX

STUDIO: Warner Brothers. Busby Berkeley’s name is in the cast list.

SYNOPSIS: Show business people are kidnapped by the Communist country of Albania. To infiltrate the country and release the famed hostages, a faux rock group is formed called “The Phynx.” The group plays in the castle for the head of the country, and the loud music causes the walls to collapse, providing freedom for the captives.