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BuzzThe Life and Art of Busby Berkeley$
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Jeffrey Spivak

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813126432

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813126432.001.0001

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A Cyclopean Vision

A Cyclopean Vision

Chapter:
(p.48) 4 A Cyclopean Vision
Source:
Buzz
Author(s):

Jeffrey Spivak

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813126432.003.0005

Though Whoopee! was regarded as a success upon its release, musical films in general were suffering a steep decline in interest. Buzz went to Paramount. Gertrude was unconvinced that her son's Hollywood career could sustain him in the same way as Broadway. Buzz's marriage was also in trouble. With a bit of fortuitous timing, good news came by way of Sam Goldwyn. Based on the success of Whoopee!, Goldwyn signed Eddie Cantor for another picture called Palmy Days, and both wanted Buzz on board. Later, however, Esther requested and was granted divorce. At this point in his career, Buzz's musical numbers were experiments in camera placement and movement, ensemble blocking, and set manipulation. After about a year of parlaying his experience at various studios into projects key to his development, Buzz was again in the employ of Sam Goldwyn. With Eddie Cantor on board, their third collaboration was called The Kid from Spain.

Keywords:   Hollywood, Whoopee!, Paramount Pictures, Sam Goldwyn, dance numbers, divorce

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