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Arthur PennAmerican Director$
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Nat Segaloff

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813129761

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813129761.001.0001

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Up at Eight, off at Nine

Up at Eight, off at Nine

Chapter:
(p.30) 4 Up at Eight, off at Nine
Source:
Arthur Penn
Author(s):

Nat Segaloff

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813129761.003.0005

In the Spring of 1950, Arthur Penn was searching for a job. He got a job in live TV quite easily as he had previous experience in TV. He had run the Soldiers' Show program for the army. In the United States the public debut of television had happened during New York World's Fair in 1939. The opening ceremonies were televised by NBC and experimental receivers were assigned around Flushing Meadows. It wasn't until the end of the 1940s that commercial broadcasts were first seen; the proliferation of television had been further obstructed as a result of World War II. This is because electronics factories had been mostly dedicated in catering to the needs of the military. However, the end of the war saw a revitalized economy and television was again on the up. In this chapter, Penn recalls how he had worked for The Colgate Comedy Hour.

Keywords:   live TV, Soldier's Show, television, The Colgate Comedy Hour, visual transmission, World War II

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