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Arthur PennAmerican Director$
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Nat Segaloff

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813129761

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813129761.001.0001

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The Edge of Chaos

The Edge of Chaos

Chapter:
(p.38) 5 The Edge of Chaos
Source:
Arthur Penn
Author(s):

Nat Segaloff

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813129761.003.0006

The golden age of television was not meant to last. It first served as a marketing ploy arranged by the television networks so that people would buy television sets, and it was also used to grant prestige to the new medium. While various anthology series changed during the period between 1948 and 1961, the public was given access to original and live dramatic presentations every night. One of the most celebrated producers of such shows was Fred Coe, and his joint work with Arthur Penn on First Person marked the start of a thirteen-year collaboration in which their efforts expanded to the stage and onscreen. During this time, Penn realized that he has not even perfected the skill of communicating with actors. In spite of taking acting classes under Michael Chekhov, Penn was still unprepared for the camera.

Keywords:   camera, golden age, television, First Person, Fred Coe, collaboration, Michael Chekhov

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