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After the DreamBlack and White Southerners since 1965$
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Timothy J. Minchin and John A. Salmond

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813129785

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813129785.001.0001

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Povertyl and Progress

Povertyl and Progress

Four Decades of Change

Chapter:
(p.273) 13 Povertyl and Progress
Source:
After the Dream
Author(s):

Timothy J. Minchin

John A. Salmond

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813129785.003.0014

None of the southern State governments have attempted to establish a body similar to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa to look into the various instances of segregation and its associated injustices. Although atonement trials may have served the same purpose, these were not able to bring about a significant impact. Those who were convicted in these trials never expressed guilt nor apologized to the affected families. Others would often claim that they had been framed and constantly assert their innocence in such crimes. There are some groups like the University of Mississippi's Winter Institute and the Committee for Truth and Reconciliation that promote the adoption of the South African model in the South. This chapter looks into how various states have been able to integrate similar schemes in attempts at imposing change especially to states that have previously experienced poverty in moves towards progress.

Keywords:   State governments, South Africa, Truth and Reconciliation Commission, poverty, progress

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