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Thomas InceHollywood's Independent Pioneer$
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Brian Taves

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813134222

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813134222.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.271) Epilogue
Source:
Thomas Ince
Author(s):

Brian Taves

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813134222.003.0019

Upon Thomas Ince's death on November 19, 1924, the studio shut down only briefly, to ensure that employees would not suffer from being thrown out of work. However, by the end of November, eighty-five employees had been laid off. No new movies were started, but several were still shooting or in the editing phase, and contracts required their delivery. Ince's wife, Elinor, quickly took an active part in the company's direction. In January 1925, Cecil B. DeMille resigned as director general of the Famous Players–Lasky Corp. He announced the formation of Cinema Corporation of America, a $10 million concern, in association with PDC, where he was vice president in charge of production. DeMille immediately needed a studio property, allowing the Ince headquarters in Culver City to be sold to him on favorable terms, for $500,000, with a $50,000 cash down payment, renaming it the Cecil B. DeMille studios.

Keywords:   Thomas Ince, studios, motion pictures, Elinor Ince, death, Cecil B. DeMille

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