Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cultivating RaceThe Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750-1860$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Watson Jennison

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813134260

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813134260.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use (for details see http://www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 October 2017

Rewriting Georgia's Racial Past, 1850s

Rewriting Georgia's Racial Past, 1850s

Chapter:
(p.277) 8 Rewriting Georgia's Racial Past, 1850s
Source:
Cultivating Race
Author(s):

Watson W. Jennison

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813134260.003.0009

By the 1850s, Georgia had emerged as one of the largest cotton-producing states in the South. In the course of a hundred years, it had transformed from a multiracial society in which people of European, African, and Native American ancestry contested for power into a slavery-based society where black and white had become synonymous with free and enslaved. This chapter examines how white Georgians explained this transformation, how they told the history of their state's rise, and how they defended the emergence of the slave system that came to characterize antebellum Georgia.

Keywords:   cotton, European, African, Native American, white, black, free, enslaved, transformation, history

Kentucky Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .