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Art for EqualityThe NAACPs Cultural Campaign for Civil Rights$
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Jenny Woodley

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813145167

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813145167.001.0001

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Blacks, Reds, White

Blacks, Reds, White

Chapter:
(p.159) 6 Blacks, Reds, White
Source:
Art for Equality
Author(s):

Jenny Woodley

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813145167.003.0007

This chapter considers the NAACP and culture in the postwar era, with a focus on film and television. In the years immediately after the war, Walter White's plan for a Hollywood Bureau caused friction with black actors. His inability to work with African Americans reflected his views on the relationship between race and popular culture. The era was also marked by the uncertainty of the anticommunist hysteria that threatened many of those in Hollywood who were sympathetic to the black cause. Finally, this chapter sees the issue of censorship raise its head again. The NAACP objected to the South's attempts to censor some of the racially liberal films of the period, but this did not mark a complete about-turn in its attitude toward censorship. The new medium of television brought new challenges, and the association's well-known campaign against Amos ‘n’ Andy saw a return to the tactics first seen in 1915.

Keywords:   Black actors, Anticommunism, Amos ‘n’ Andy, Censorship

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