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Charles WaltersThe Director Who Made Hollywood Dance$
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Brent Phillips

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813147215

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813147215.001.0001

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“You Think Like a Director”

“You Think Like a Director”

Chapter:
(p.55) 7 “You Think Like a Director”
Source:
Charles Walters
Author(s):

Brent Phillips

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813147215.003.0007

In this chapter, Walters does his initial work in the movies, staging dances for RKO’s Seven Days Leave. John Darrow finds success in Hollywood, negotiating movie contracts for his clients, including Gene Kelly. At Kelly’s suggestion, Walters accepts a four-week offer of work at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) for the film adaptation of Du Barry Was a Lady. This chapter takes a succinct look at the history of M-G-M (pre-1942) and the studio’s dedication to the “star system.” It also explores M-G-M’s role in the development of the “integrated” movie musical and producer Arthur Freed’s “Unit” of film musical production. Walters’ professional relationships with Lucille Ball and Roger Edens are discussed. The chapter concludes with Walters’ accepting a seven-year contract with M-G-M.

Keywords:   Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios, Star system, The integrated musical, Arthur Freed, producer, The Freed Unit, Lucille Ball, Roger Edens

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