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Veit HarlanThe Life and Work of a Nazi Filmmaker$
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Frank Noack

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813167008

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.001.0001

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The Interview

The Interview

Chapter:
(p.64) 6 The Interview
Source:
Veit Harlan
Author(s):

Frank Noack

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.003.0007

This chapter deals with Harlan’s life and career following the appointment of Adolf Hitler as the German Reich’s chancellor on January 30, 1933. He gives an interview to the Nazi paper Völkischer Beobachter in which he denounces Jewish colleagues and one Jewish critic (Alfred Kerr, who has consistently praised him) and falsely claims to come from a family with a military background. Whether he is quoted correctly or not, as he would later insist, the interview doesn’t further his career. He remains a supporting actor, however much in demand, whose boy-next-door image seems increasingly risible. When fellow actor Gustaf Gründgens, who is the same age, is handed over the direction of the State Theater and thus becomes Harlan’s superior, a frustrated Harlan decides not to renew his contract and to try his hand at directing at a different theater.

Keywords:   boy-next-door image, denouncing Jewish colleagues, frustration, interview, Völkischer Beobachter, Nazi takeover, professional jealousy, Gustaf Gründgrens

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