Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Veit HarlanThe Life and Work of a Nazi Filmmaker$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frank Noack

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813167008

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use (for details see http://www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 10 December 2017

The German Soul

The German Soul

Chapter:
(p.207) 16 The German Soul
Source:
Veit Harlan
Author(s):

Frank Noack

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.003.0017

This chapter deals with the preproduction and shooting of two literary adaptations in Agfacolor, Immensee (Drone Bees Lake) and Opfergang (Path of sacrifice), in the summer of 1942. During the extended postproduction of these two films, the Sixth Army surrenders at Stalingrad, Dora Gerson and her family are murdered at Auschwitz, and Harlan is given the title professor. In 1943, he starts work on his fourth film in Agfacolor, the epic Kolberg, which glorifies Prussian resistance to the armies of Napoleon, who, as in two previous Harlan films, is celebrated as a great leader who just happens to be on the enemy’s side. During the first massive air raids on Berlin in November 1943, the film editors of Immensee are killed. The film itself is Harlan’s most peaceful and idyllic one. With its pure heroine who remains faithful to her husband even if she loves another man, it becomes a favorite of German soldiers.

Keywords:   air raids, Auschwitz, faithful heroine, Napoleonic war, Prussian resistance, pure heroine, Sixth Army surrender, Immensee, Opfergang, Kolberg

Kentucky Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .