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Veit HarlanThe Life and Work of a Nazi Filmmaker$
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Frank Noack

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813167008

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.001.0001

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Heimatfilm Noir

Heimatfilm Noir

Chapter:
(p.285) 23 Heimatfilm Noir
Source:
Veit Harlan
Author(s):

Frank Noack

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813167008.003.0024

This chapter deals with release of Harlan’s first two postwar films in 1951, Unsterbliche Geliebte (Immortal beloved) and Hanna Amon, both of which provoke the largest demonstrations in West Germany until the late 1960s as well as intense police brutality in response. To many leftist activists, this is the real birth of the West German student movement. To the students’ surprise, Harlan insists on a direct verbal confrontation at universities and manages to win over some of his detractors. The demonstrations are not directed against the content of the films themselves, despite the fact that Hanna Amon is a remake of Jud Süss, with the male Jewish villain replaced by a man-hungry, elderly nymphomaniac woman from some unspecified southern Europe country. Munich lawyers propose a “Lex Harlan” to prohibit the release of all Harlan films.

Keywords:   comeback, demonstrations, police brutality, student movement, university students, xenophobia, Unsterbliche Geliebte, Hanna Amon

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