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Nixon's Back Channel to Moscow
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Nixon's Back Channel to Moscow: Confidential Diplomacy and Détente

Richard A. Moss

Abstract

The changing international environment of the 1960s made it possible to attain détente, a relaxation of tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union. Back-channel diplomacy—confidential contacts between the White House and the Kremlin, mainly between National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger and the Soviet ambassador to the United States, Anatoly Dobrynin—transformed that possibility into reality. This book argues that although back-channel diplomacy was useful in improving U.S.-Soviet relations in the short term by acting as a safety valve and giving policy-actors a personal stake ... More

Keywords: Richard M. Nixon, Henry A. Kissinger, Anatoly F. Dobrynin, Leonid I. Brezhnev, Andrei Gromyko, Détente, Soviet Union, Back-channel diplomacy, Vietnam, Arms control

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2017 Print ISBN-13: 9780813167879
Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2017 DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813167879.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Richard A. Moss, author
US Naval War College