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Horace HolleyTransylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic$

James P. Cousins

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813168579

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813168579.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use (for details see http://www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy). Subscriber: null; date: 20 June 2018

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Source:
Horace Holley
Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky

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The earliest portrait of Horace, commissioned by an unnamed Hollis Street parishioner. Gilbert Stuart painted the original in 1821, and artist Rembrandt Peale converted it to a lithograph for use in Charles Caldwell’s book A Discourse on the Genius and Character of the Rev. Horace Holley, published in 1828.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Transylvania trustees commissioned this first of two portraits of Horace by Kentucky artist Matthew Harris Jouett in 1820. Here, preaching cords found in Stuart’s portrait were replaced by the more fashionable and religiously neutral high collar.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Horace’s visit to Andrew Jackson’s home, the Hermitage, in 1823 was commemorated by Tennessee portrait artist Ralph E. W. Earl. The work was added to Earl’s private gallery of distinguished southern gentlemen.

Courtesy Tennessee State Museum, Nashville.

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This second portrait of Horace by Kentucky-born artist Matthew Harris Jouett was commissioned and completed a short time before Horace left Kentucky in 1827. The addition of a quill and parchment is elegant testimony to Horace’s more scholarly deportment.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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John Milton Holley (1777–1836), portrait by Edwin White, 1844. Horace and brother Milton passed hundreds, perhaps thousands, of letters to each other over the course of their short lives.

Courtesy Salisbury Association Inc., Salisbury, Conn.

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Papyrotamia images of Horace and Mary Austin, completed just prior to their leaving Kentucky in 1827. Silhouettes were captured with the assistance of candlelight, a “profile machine,” and white paper and then were recast in papyrotamia, a once popular but mostly forgotten decorative art. Cut paper was fashioned into the image, glazed, and mounted in a frame.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Luther Holley (1755–1826), center. Woodcut impression made during his time in the New york state legislature. This rather bland imprint captures almost none of the features later described by Mary austin Holley in Discourse on the Genius and Character of the Rev. Horace Holley.

From E. B. o’callaghan, Documentary History of New York, vol. 4 (albany: charles Van Benthuysen, 1851), 1024.

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Map of Salisbury, 1874.

courtesy Salisbury association Inc., Salisbury, conn.

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Lakeview home of Luther and Sally Holley (right), 1899. A hotel (left) was added to the original home sometime after Luther’s death.

Courtesy Salisbury Association Inc., Salisbury, Conn.

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West College, the first and most versatile building on the Williams College campus. At the time Horace was a student at Williams, the building housed a chapel and dining hall and was the institution’s main boardinghouse. Lithograph by C. Currier and E. Valois, 1790.

Courtesy Williams College Archives and Special Collections, Williamstown, Mass.

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A Front View of Yale-College and the College Chapel in New Haven by Daniel Bowen, 1786.

Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

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Timothy Dwight (1752–1817), portrait by Jonathan Trumbull, 1817. Dwight’s impression on Horace was immediate and long lasting. Horace patterned his career and gauged his success after Dwight’s example, following a path to Greenfield Hill and a career in academia.

Courtesy Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

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Greenfield Hill, drawing by John Warner Barber, c. 1830. The First Presbyterian church is on the right, Horace’s school on the left.

courtesy connecticut Historical Society, Hartford.

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Hollis Street church in the first years of Horace’s pastorate. This building was replaced in 1811 by a more commodious structure.

From James H. Stark, Antique Views of ye Towne of Boston (Boston: Photo-electrotype engraving, 1882), 323.

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Transylvania University, drawing by Matthew Harris Jouett, 1818. Completed shortly before Horace’s arrival, the main building was considered to be the most impressive structure in Lexington. Adjacent, but not shown, were a dining hall and separate living quarters.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Constantine Rafinesque (1783–1840), artist unknown. Horace struggled to understand Rafinesque’s value as an instructor and scholar, despite his numerous contributions to the natural sciences.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Henry Clay (1777–1852), portrait by Matthew Harris Jouett, 1818. Clay was Horace’s original and most significant supporter in Kentucky. Their affiliation also speeded Horace’s departure when Kentucky politics drifted toward Jacksonian populism.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.

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Joseph Desha (1768–1842), portrait by Katherine Helm, c. 1909. Desha’s address to the Kentucky legislature, delivered shortly after his gubernatorial inauguration in 1824, asserted a more restrictive policy of state support of higher education and signaled the end of Transylvania’s golden age under Horace.

Courtesy Transylvania University Special Collections and Archives, Lexington.