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Architect of Air PowerGeneral Laurence S. Kuter and the Birth of the US Air Force$
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Brian D. Laslie

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813169989

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813169989.001.0001

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The Coming War

The Coming War

Chapter:
(p.45) 3 The Coming War
Source:
Architect of Air Power
Author(s):

Brian D. Laslie

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813169989.003.0004

Chapter Three is about the coming war and the invention of American air power. Kuter said on his arrival in Washington D.C. in 1939 that “One thing was apparent: whoever was running the Air Corps at that time, it wasn’t the Chief of the Air Corps.” This chapter will discuss the planning for the coming air war and the writing of Air War Planning Document-1 in only nine days. Beyond planning for an air war with an air force that did not exist, Kuter also led the effort to set up an Air Staff and in 1942 drew national attention by making a huge jump in rank. On January 5th, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel and less than a month later to brigadier general on February 2nd, skipping the rank of bird colonel entirely. This made Kuter, at 36, the youngest general officer of his time and the youngest since William Sherman.

Keywords:   War Department, general officer, AWPD-1, war plans

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