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Architect of Air PowerGeneral Laurence S. Kuter and the Birth of the US Air Force$
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Brian D. Laslie

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813169989

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813169989.001.0001

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North Africa

North Africa

Chapter:
(p.73) 5 North Africa
Source:
Architect of Air Power
Author(s):

Brian D. Laslie

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813169989.003.0006

Chapter Five demonstrates that Kuter’s reputation as an organizer led him to be ordered to North Africa. In January of 1943, Eisenhower consolidated his North African air power into an Allied Air Force. Eisenhower placed “Tooey” Spaatz in overall command with the U.S. Twelfth Air Force and the British Eastern Air Command under him. To help him organize the Allied Air Force Carl A. Spaatz wanted Brigadier General Laurence S. Kuter, to come to Algiers to help coordinate air units widely separated and weakly connected by centralized command. Kuter greatly aided in this and also in linking air and ground operations. In this assignment Kuter crossed paths and crossed words with ground commanders including General George Patton.

Keywords:   North Africa, North Africa tactical air force

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