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A Political Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois$
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Nick Bromell

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780813174907

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813174907.001.0001

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“Love Is God, and Work Is His Prophet”

“Love Is God, and Work Is His Prophet”

Decolonial Extension and Gandhian Exploration in Du Bois’s Interwar Years

Chapter:
(p.303) 11 “Love Is God, and Work Is His Prophet”
Source:
A Political Companion to W. E. B. Du Bois
Author(s):

David Haekwon Kim

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813174907.003.0012

This essay, by David Haekwon Kim, examines Du Bois’s political transition during the interwar years from political expressionism to black Marxism. As Du Bois moved from being firmly in one category to entrench himself in the other, his views were broader than those espoused by black Marxism but narrower than those of a radical democrat, best aligning with the theory of decolonial democracy. Du Bois is often hailed as a precursor or progenitor of decolonial thought, as aspects of the central decolonial concept of “coloniality” are sprinkled throughout his work. Kim argues that the tension and complexity of different aspects of Du Bois’s politics reveal Du Bois as a distinctive type of decolonial thinker who experimented with a fusion of black radicalism and the Gandhian notions of liberation and nonviolent resistance.

Keywords:   W. E. B. Du Bois, black Marxism, political theory, political economy, decolonial thought, Gandhism, race relations, Dark Princess

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