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Berlin on the BrinkThe Blockade, the Airlift, and the Early Cold War$
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Daniel Harrington

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813136134

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813136134.001.0001

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Dealing Sensibly with Established Fact

Dealing Sensibly with Established Fact

Chapter:
(p.261) Chapter 12 Dealing Sensibly with Established Fact
Source:
Berlin on the Brink
Author(s):

Daniel F. Harrington

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813136134.003.0013

Chapter 12 charts the diplomatic effects of the airlift’s unexpected success: Stalin’s decision to abandon the blockade, the Jessup-Malik talks, and the Paris Council of Foreign Ministers meeting. Most accounts hold that Stalin decided in January 1949 to lift the blockade, but he may have made his decision in March, after it became clear that winter would not ground the airlift. In the Jessup-Malik talks, the Russians tried, without success, to trade a lifting of the blockade for a suspension of the London program. In Paris, both sides advanced maximum proposals. They settled for the status quo: the division of Berlin, Germany, and Europe. In doing so, they brought the initial phase of the Cold War to a close.

Keywords:   Cold War, Council of Foreign Ministers, Jessup-Malik talks, Stalin

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