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Kentucky's Frontier HighwayHistorical Landscapes along the Maysville Road$
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Karl Raitz and Robert Roland-Holst

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813136646

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813136646.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

From Turnpike to Parkway

From Turnpike to Parkway

Chapter:
(p.87) 10 From Turnpike to Parkway
Source:
Kentucky's Frontier Highway
Author(s):

Karl Raitz

Nancy O’Malley

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813136646.003.0010

The most heavily travelled portion of the Maysville Road was the section that connected Lexington and Paris. By the 1820s, farms aligned the route and more than a dozen inns and taverns provided meals and overnight accommodations for carriage and stagecoach passengers and drovers. In 1827, state-appointed surveyors laid out a nearly straight road from Lexington to Paris. Road builders completed the realignment by the mid-1830s and the new alignment remained the primary route for more than 170 years. The road's historic turnpike configuration did not adapt well to motorized traffic which began in the 1920s. Engineers developed plans to rebuild the road and widen Paris Pike to four lanes in the late 1960s but protests and lawsuits led to development of revised construction plans that protracted the reconstruction process. Construction on a new four lane Paris Pike parkway began in 1997 and opened for traffic in 2003. The completed parkway has received numerous accolades and awards. [no longer true] As each segment is straightened, the traces established by Indians, buffalo, pioneers, and turnpikers, in turn, recede, eventually becoming lost landscapes.

Keywords:   Paris Pike, Road design, Modernization, Lost landscapes

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