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Kentucky's Frontier HighwayHistorical Landscapes along the Maysville Road$
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Karl Raitz and Robert Roland-Holst

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813136646

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813136646.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Traveling the Road

Traveling the Road

Chapter:
(p.17) 2 Traveling the Road
Source:
Kentucky's Frontier Highway
Author(s):

Karl Raitz

Nancy O’Malley

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813136646.003.0002

Travel is a multidimensional process that blends predictable and unpredictable events. In the early years of historic settlement, the Limestone Trace-Maysville Road was the last leg of a long journey. This chapter employs travelers’ reports from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to illuminate the conditions of travel, the character of the lands through which they passed, and the changing accommodations that awaited them at roadside. The early route into the coveted Inner Bluegrass country required three or even four days to reach Lexington. Local residents established roadside businesses offering food, drink, overnight lodging, and stabling and feed for horses, businesses that state laws sought to regulate. A railroad between Maysville and Lexington drew business away from the road's stagecoach lines as travelers opted to patronize the faster and more comfortable trains. By 1865, hotels in road towns such as Paris had largely replaced the old countryside inns. Automotive travel increased after 1945 and the old central city hotels lost clientele to the new roadside motels that situated at city gateways. All of this demonstrates a reciprocal relationship between road and traveler.

Keywords:   Travel, Lodging, Tavern, Hotel, Motel

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