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Being in the WorldDialogue and Cosmopolis$
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Fred Dallmayr

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813141916

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813141916.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

The Body Politic

The Body Politic

Fortunes and Misfortunes of a Concept

Chapter:
(p.101) 7. The Body Politic
Source:
Being in the World
Author(s):

Fred Dallmayr

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813141916.003.0008

This chapter explores the conflict between the mind and body and attempts to move beyond traditional understanding of this relationship. As the chapter indicates, ancient thought tended to view the political community as a homogenous organism nurtured by convention. This conception was ruptured by the onset of the idea of the mind as a creative force confronting the external world. The chapter closely examines this conception as it was articulated by leading modern thinkers, including Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Rousseau. In opposition to both contractual and physicalist treatments of this theory, the chapter sketches the alternative conception of the political community seen as an interactive or relational body.

Keywords:   Mind, Body, Politics, Creativity, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Rousseau

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