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De Bow's ReviewThe Antebellum Vision of a New South$
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John F. Kvach

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813144207

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813144207.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 23 May 2022

Learning to Be Southern and American

Learning to Be Southern and American

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 Learning to Be Southern and American
Source:
De Bow's Review
Author(s):

John F. Kvach

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813144207.003.0002

This chapter examines how economic, political, and social changes in early nineteenth-century Charleston, South Carolina, influenced De Bow’s life. Born at a time when financial panic, sectional crisis, and potential slave revolts altered the mood and outlook of Charleston, De Bow accepted opportunities as they came, failed at many of them, and eventually settled on writing as his best chance of escaping his difficult childhood. As a young adult he emerged from Charleston with a sharp intellect, an articulate tongue, and a talented pen. His emergence as a local thinker and writer caught the attention of some of the city’s most prominent businessmen, who asked him to represent Charleston at an upcoming commercial convention in Memphis, Tennessee. It would be during this trip, while sitting with John C. Calhoun, that De Bow decided to leave Charleston for New Orleans and start a monthly journal dedicated to southern economic development.

Keywords:   Charleston, South Carolina, John C. Calhoun, Southern Economic Development, Southerner

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