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De Bow's ReviewThe Antebellum Vision of a New South$
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John F. Kvach

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780813144207

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813144207.001.0001

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The Reformulation of De Bow’s Old New South

The Reformulation of De Bow’s Old New South

Chapter:
(p.151) 7 The Reformulation of De Bow’s Old New South
Source:
De Bow's Review
Author(s):

John F. Kvach

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813144207.003.0008

This chapter highlights De Bow’s rebirth as a national figure after the Civil War and during Reconstruction. Many southerners questioned his previous position on secession and slavery. Yet by 1866 De Bow had reopened his editorial offices. He launched himself into new projects that he hoped would re-create the South without the burden of slavery. He publically renounced his position on slavery and encouraged white southerners to accept emancipation. He hoped that freed blacks would be educated and trained so as not to become a burden on the southern economy. De Bow pressed for the acceptance of immigrants and encouraged southerners to plant new crops and manufacture new products. He wrote articles that encouraged investment in southern lumber, coal, and oil. He preached regional harmony and promoted the Lost Cause. Unfortunately for the South, De Bow died unexpectedly in February 1867.

Keywords:   Reconstruction, Lost Cause, New South, Freed Slaves, Southern Immigration

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