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For Brotherhood and DutyThe Civil War History of the West Point Class of 1862$
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Brian R. McEnany

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813160627

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813160627.001.0001

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Mackenzie, Gillespie, Calef, Egan, Dearing, and Schaff during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns

Mackenzie, Gillespie, Calef, Egan, Dearing, and Schaff during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns

Chapter:
(p.247) 13 Mackenzie, Gillespie, Calef, Egan, Dearing, and Schaff during the Overland and Petersburg Campaigns
Source:
For Brotherhood and Duty
Author(s):

Brian R. McEnany

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813160627.003.0013

From May to July, 1864, several members of the class participated in the Overland campaign and the siege of Petersburg with the Army of the Potomac. George Gillespie’s actions at Bethesda Church as the Army of the Potomac prepared to attack Cold Harbor would much later in life precipitate the award of the Medal of Honor for his actions. Ranald Mackenzie was appointed to command a demoralized Second Connecticut Heavy Artillery Regiment (converted to infantry) after the first attack at Cold Harbor. John Calef’s Horse Battery A, Second US Artillery, supported Brig. Gen. David Gregg’s cavalry division at St. Mary’s Church as it protected the movement of the Army of the Potomac’s wagon trains to the James River. During the Petersburg siege, John Egan’s horse artillery battery, Company E, Fourth US Artillery, supported Maj. Gen. James H. Wilson’s cavalry raid to destroy the Staunton River Bridge in June 1864. When Wilson’s troopers attempt to return to friendly lines on June 19, they find Ream’s Station in enemy hands. Egan’s battery attempts to escape, but his guns are bogged down in a swampy creek bottom. He is captured and sent to an officers’ prison camp in South Carolina. Meanwhile, Morris Schaff establishes an ordnance depot near Grant’s headquarters at City Point to support the army’s ammunition needs, but a saboteur destroys it in August 1864.

Keywords:   Overland Campaign, Petersburg, Cold Harbor, Sixth Corps, Sheridan’s Cavalry Corps, Explosion at City Point, Ream’s Station, Wilson-Kautz Raid

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