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Ziegfeld and His FolliesA Biography of Broadway's Greatest Producer$
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Cynthia Brideson and Sara Brideson

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813160887

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813160887.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

“You Can’t Ever Kill Magic”

Chapter:
(p.435) Epilogue
Source:
Ziegfeld and His Follies
Author(s):

Cynthia Brideson

Sara Brideson

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813160887.003.0025

The epilogue reiterates the book’s primary argument that Ziegfeld was not the ruthless, womanizing, one-dimensional producer many historians have made him out to be. It reflects on his flaws but focuses more on the unexpectedly tender side of his personality, as shown through his treatment of his daughter, his stars, and his wives. Also discussed is his impact on the image of women in the twentieth century and how his visions changed the popular view of beauty. The innovations Ziegfeld brought to musical theater are reviewed (e.g., integrating song with plot; elevating chorus girls into legitimate actresses; employing a sole songwriter or songwriting team to compose an entire score; and incorporating aspects of different types of musicals, such as the French revue, vaudeville, European operetta, and American book musical, to produce unique shows). The book ends with a statement by Will Rogers asserting that Ziegfeld created a special type of magic that could never be killed.

Keywords:   Will Rogers, Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., Anna Held, Billie Burke, Bernard Sobel

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