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Venerable TreesHistory, Biology, and Conservation in the Bluegrass$
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Tom Kimmerer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813165660

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813165660.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

The Ingleside Oak

The Ingleside Oak

The Bluegrass and the Nashville Basin in 1779

Chapter:
(p.71) 5 The Ingleside Oak
Source:
Venerable Trees
Author(s):

Tom Kimmerer

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813165660.003.0006

A huge bur oak in Fayette County once stood on the edge of an estate near downtown Lexington. The tree was there when the main road was a buffalo trace and remains today. This chapter recounts what is known about the Bluegrass just before permanent settlement in 1779. Drought and bison played a major role in creation of the woodland pasture habitat, while Indians and fire did not. The chapter stresses the importance of vast herds of bison grazing down grass and cane and then leaving for long periods, allowing trees to become established. Immediately after settlement, the bison were driven off, replaced by cattle and sheep and later by horses. There has been little regeneration of woodland pasture species since the bison left.

Keywords:   bur oak, bison, drought, grazing, forest regeneration, woodland pasture

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