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Sidney J. FurieLife and Films$
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Daniel Kremer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813165967

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813165967.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

Through a Glass Refracted

Through a Glass Refracted

The Wild Angles Picture Show

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter 5 Through a Glass Refracted
Source:
Sidney J. Furie
Author(s):

Daniel Kremer

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813165967.003.0006

Because of the success of The Leather Boys, Furie is offered the chance to direct an adaptation of Len Deighton’s spy novel The Ipcress File (1965) for producer Harry Saltzman. Furie and Saltzman go to war on the set of the film, as a would-be James Bond imitation is hijacked into becoming an art film. The film, shot largely through objects in the frame, segmenting the composition, scores critically and commercially and introduces Michael Caine to the world as a leading man. Hollywood then comes knocking on Furie’s door. He is offered two projects, but after starting preproduction on both, he later leaves both. A third offer is the one that sticks: The Appaloosa (1966), a Western starring Marlon Brando. Telling the story again with the wild angles patented in The Ipcress File, Furie goes head-to-head with Brando in a battle of wills that in many way parallels the Saltzman war. The film is released to middling reviews and meager box office. Furie soon meets Brad Dexter, ex-actor and now Frank Sinatra’s producer, and through him is hired as the director of a thriller starring Sinatra, called The Naked Runner (1967). Furie goes head-to-head again, and the film flops.

Keywords:   Spy, espionage, Western, composition, experimental

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