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American Justice In TaiwanThe 1957 Riots and Cold War Foreign Policy$
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Stephen G. Craft

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813166353

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813166353.001.0001

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Accusations

Accusations

Chapter:
(p.118) 10 Accusations
Source:
American Justice In Taiwan
Author(s):

Stephen G. Craft

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813166353.003.0010

Chapter 10 describes the American response to the events of Black Friday, which was a violation of international law and could have been considered grounds for breaking diplomatic relations. In the days following the riots there were minor accidents that could have sparked new protests, creating a feeling of panic among many Americans. Back in the United States, Black Friday was regarded as an embarrassment to the White House, thus allowing Democrats to openly criticize Eisenhower's China Policy. Many speculated that the protests may have been pre-orchestrated due to the unannounced military exercise that diverted troops that day, the ROC's manipulation of the press, and the identity of the rioters, who could be traced back to three particular schools. The instigators remain unknown, though many blamed the ROC, IRP, PRC, communist agitators, or even Chiang Kai-shek and his heir. After Black Friday, many questions remained unanswered, and this time the Americans were demanding justice.

Keywords:   Black Friday, ROC, Operation Fist, Eisenhower, China Policy, Chiang Kai-shek, Taiwan

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