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American Justice In TaiwanThe 1957 Riots and Cold War Foreign Policy$
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Stephen G. Craft

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813166353

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813166353.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 23 June 2021

Advice and Dissent

Advice and Dissent

Chapter:
(p.19) 3 Advice and Dissent
Source:
American Justice In Taiwan
Author(s):

Stephen G. Craft

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813166353.003.0003

Chapter 3 explains the complex story of the tensions that existed in the U.S.-ROC alliance prior to the Reynolds shooting in order to provide further context for Chinese reactions to the shooting and subsequent events. Besides cultural differences and resentments stretching back to WWII, the relationship was not between equals. The United States was a superpower while the ROC, which once nominally ruled a country of considerable demographic and geographic proportions, now only controlled a group of islands with a population of less than ten million. The United States did not intend to colonize Taiwan, but its efforts to ensure that the ROC effectively contained the PRC and became a showcase for Asia revealed the extent and limitations of its hegemonic power in Asia in the 1950s. Although U.S. support and protection prevented defeat by the communists, the ROC wanted to limit its dependency on America. While it tried to secure more aid and other political goals through manipulation of the U.S. government, the ROC allowed a secret unit of Japanese military advisors to operate in Taiwan to counterbalance MAAG's attempts to exert influence at all levels of ROC policymaking.

Keywords:   China, United States, ROC, PRC, MAAG, Taiwan, Asia, 1950s

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