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Living SustainablyWhat Intentional Communities Can Teach Us about Democracy, Simplicity, and Nonviolence$
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A. Whitney Sanford

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813168630

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813168630.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Asking What’s for Dinner

Asking What’s for Dinner

Chapter:
(p.107) 5 Asking What’s for Dinner
Source:
Living Sustainably
Author(s):

A. Whitney Sanford

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813168630.003.0006

This chapter illustrates how intentional communities translate their bundled values of nonviolence, self-sufficiency, equity, and voluntary simplicity through producing and consuming food. These communities ask what constitutes violence in terms of food and make choices that accord with their specific contexts, goals and geographies, e.g., local vs organic. Catholic worker houses must balance goals of hospitality to the poor with their goals of sustainability. Food rescue helps them combat waste and feed the poor. Whether to eat meat and communal eating become two areas of tension in communities. This chapter explores first, how these communities perform these bundled values in their food practices, including what they eat, what they grow, and what they purchase or gather; and second, the processes and trade-offs of practicing these values.

Keywords:   Nonviolence, Food, Hospitality, Catholic worker, Local, Organic, Sustainability, Possibility Alliance, Food rescue, meat

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