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Barbara La MarrThe Girl Who Was Too Beautiful for Hollywood$
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Sherri Snyder

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813174259

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813174259.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Twenty-Three

Twenty-Three

Chapter:
(p.235) Twenty-Three
Source:
Barbara La Marr
Author(s):

Sherri Snyder

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813174259.003.0024

The pressures of fame are wearing on Barbara as she attempts to balance numerous career commitments with being a good wife and mother. This chapter is largely devoted to Barbara’s role in TheEternal City (1923), a film involving both her unprecedented trip to Italy and a leading role among a stellar cast. Details pertaining to the film’s production, plot, and critical reception are addressed, including the cast and crew’s entanglements with fascist leader and Italian prime minister Benito Mussolini. That Barbara’s European trip is also intended to be her honeymoon with Jack—and that it isn’t the romantic fairy tale film magazines purport it to be—also factors into the chapter’s content. The chapter closes with Barbara’s attainment of her fondest childhood aspiration, her official induction into stardom’s ranks: Arthur Sawyer presents her with a long-term contract for starring pictures to be produced by him and distributed by First National.

Keywords:   Barbara, Eternal City, Mussolini, Jack, Sawyer

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