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Barbara La MarrThe Girl Who Was Too Beautiful for Hollywood$
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Sherri Snyder

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813174259

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813174259.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Twenty-Eight

Twenty-Eight

Chapter:
(p.286) Twenty-Eight
Source:
Barbara La Marr
Author(s):

Sherri Snyder

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813174259.003.0029

Six weeks behind schedule due to run-ins with film censors, Sandra (1924), Barbara’s first film under her starring contract with Arthur Sawyer’s Associated Pictures Corporation and First National, enters production. Feeling intense pressure to succeed in the role, Barbara pushes through filming; Sawyer, exercising complete control over the production, again underscores her vamp image.My Husband’s Wives (1924), written four years earlier by Barbara for the Fox Film Corporation, is released the same day as Sandra; details relating to plot synopses, critical reception, and production are given for both films. Barbara, haunted by the medical diagnosis she received months earlier, lives life to the fullest, diving headlong into an affair with socialite Benjamin (“Ben”) Finney. Wanting to marry Finney but lacking legal clearance to do so, Barbara becomes the center of another scandal near the chapter’s close: a purported suicide attempt.

Keywords:   Barbara, Sandra, My Husband’s Wives, Finney, Ben (Deely), Jack, suicide

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