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The Struggle Is EternalGloria Richardson and Black Liberation$
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Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780813176499

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813176499.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 01 July 2022

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Chapter:
(p.213) 11 Back to Work
Source:
The Struggle Is Eternal
Author(s):

Joseph R. Fitzgerald

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813176499.003.0012

The final chapter briefly touches on Richardson’s second divorce but focuses on her difficulties finding and keeping employment. After holding a series of jobs in various corporate and not-for-profit agencies, Richardson eventually earned a permanent civil service position with the City of New York, where she worked until the twenty-first century. In one way or another, all her jobs involved some kind of social justice. Over the last five decades, Richardson has paid close attention to social change movements, including Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter, and this chapter discusses her thoughts about them, particularly her view that young people have the capability and vision to lead the nation to greater freedom, just as young people did in the 1960s. She advises them to replicate the group-centered and member-driven model student activists employed in the early 1960s and to avoid becoming ideological.

Keywords:   Black Lives Matter, group-centered model, leadership, member-driven model, Occupy Wall Street, social change movements, systemic racism

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