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Subordinating IntelligenceThe DoD/CIA Post-Cold War Relationship$
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David P. Oakley

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813176703

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813176703.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

“It’s the Economy, Stupid”

“It’s the Economy, Stupid”

The Clinton Years and Intelligence Reform

Chapter:
(p.91) 5 “It’s the Economy, Stupid”
Source:
Subordinating Intelligence
Author(s):

David P. Oakley

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813176703.003.0006

During the Clinton presidency, international and domestic conditions drove changes within the CIA and DoD that affected their partnership. The CIA and the DoD had been established during the Cold War, so a significant amount of their energy had been focused on the Soviet Union. After the Soviet fall, both organizations wrestled with their roles in a multipolar world, while policy makers slashed budgets and looked for ways to reorient both organizations. Various national and institutional issues influenced the DoD/CIA partnership in the 1990s. These seemingly separate issues merged to shape the organizations and therefore influenced how the DoD/CIA relationship evolved during the 1990s.

Keywords:   economy, budget cuts, prioritization, reinventing government, partnership, reorient, peacekeeping operations, Somalia, Balkans, military operations other than war

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