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The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924-1945$
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Yan Xu

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813176741

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813176741.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Enlisting Citizens in the Military Mobilization of the Nationalist State

Enlisting Citizens in the Military Mobilization of the Nationalist State

Chapter:
(p.53) 2 Enlisting Citizens in the Military Mobilization of the Nationalist State
Source:
The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924-1945
Author(s):

Yan Xu

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813176741.003.0003

Xu discusses how conscription laws, army textbooks, and the New Life Movement propaganda helped the Chinese Nationalist state construct the soldier figure in the 1930s. These supplementary materials aided in configuring the citizenship ideal the Nationalist Party envisioned of their soldiers at Whampoa. In addition, literacy education was pivotal to morality and virtue, and thus was implemented into programs for the soldiers in order to educate the young individuals who previously had not been or were poorly taught. Despite these attempts, much of society did not respect and attempt to emulate these soldiers because of their social status and the fact that they still had few rights.

Keywords:   Citizenship Ideal, Literacy Education, Soldiers, Conscription Law, New Life Movement, Military Mobilization

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