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The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924-1945$
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Yan Xu

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813176741

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813176741.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 23 May 2022

The Army-People Bond in Mass Culture in Wartime Yan’an

The Army-People Bond in Mass Culture in Wartime Yan’an

Chapter:
(p.139) 6 The Army-People Bond in Mass Culture in Wartime Yan’an
Source:
The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924-1945
Author(s):

Yan Xu

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813176741.003.0007

The sixth chapter outlines another political force that influenced modern China: the Chinese Communists during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Xu claims that the CCP constructed the soldier figure here within the parameters of an emotional bond between the army and the people, believing it to be essential for the state-building agenda that was contingent on winning support from peasants in the area and social integration in the revolutionary base. Xu, furthermore, splits the chapter up by examining first the CCP’s policies in Yan’an for integration and winning support from peasants, then later the army-peasant bond during the yangge movement.

Keywords:   Chinese Communist Revolution, Mao Zedong, Social Emotion, Army-People Relations, Yan’an, Yangge Drama, Great Production Campaign, Literary Rectification

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