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Hitchcock and the Censors$
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John Billheimer

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780813177427

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813177427.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 29 November 2020

The Paradine Case (1947)

The Paradine Case (1947)

Chapter:
(p.129) 15 The Paradine Case (1947)
Source:
Hitchcock and the Censors
Author(s):

John Billheimer

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813177427.003.0016

The Paradine Case is another example of an instance in which the Code insistence that evildoers must be punished altered the screenplay and weakened the film. The leading character in the source novel was an adulteress and murderess who is acquitted of the charge of murder through perjured testimony and commits suicide after the truth is revealed?all red flags for Code reviewers. It was the final film Hitchcock made with David O. Selznick, whose constant interference and script rewrites caused irritating delays and rarely improved the plot and dialogue. The delays and changes were debilitating, causing Hitchcock to take more time in shooting this film than any of his other movies, and the film lost over $2 million for Selznick International.

Keywords:   Alfred Hitchcock, David O. Selznick, adultery, courtroom drama, Production Code Administration, producer interference, perjury, punishment of evildoers, The Paradine Case

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