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The SailorFranklin D. Roosevelt and the Transformation of American Foreign Policy$
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David F. Schmitz

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780813180441

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813180441.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 03 July 2022

Constructing an Internationalist Framework, 1933–1936

Constructing an Internationalist Framework, 1933–1936

Chapter:
(p.35) 2 Constructing an Internationalist Framework, 1933–1936
Source:
The Sailor
Author(s):

David F. Schmitz

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813180441.003.0003

Upon taking office, Roosevelt was unwilling to risk raising controversial foreign policy issues while implementing the New Deal. He supported the Stimson Doctrine of non-recognition of Japan's conquest of Manchuria, expanding trade to promote recovery, and implementing the Good Neighbor Policy toward Latin America. While the Good Neighbor Policy was designed to bring an end to American intervention in Latin America, Roosevelt cast the policy in global terms. He saw the Good Neighbor as a means to make concrete his internationalist vision for American foreign policy that could be applied elsewhere in the world.

Keywords:   FDR, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President, Foreign Policy, International Relations, Good Neighbor Policy, Latin America, Manchuria, Internationlist, Stimson Doctrine, the New Deal

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