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Racing for AmericaThe Horse Race of the Century and the Redemption of a Sport$
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James C. Nicholson

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780813180649

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813180649.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 28 May 2022

American Dreams

American Dreams

Chapter:
(p.8) 1 American Dreams
Source:
Racing for America
Author(s):

James C. Nicholson

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813180649.003.0002

Chapter One discusses the rural roots of the men most responsible for Zev's racing career: oil tycoon Harry F. Sinclair, the owner; cantankerous trainer Sam Hildreth; and jockey Earl Sande, a budding national celebrity. Profiles in American newspapers during the buildup to the Race of the Century described the three men's rise from humble, rural roots in the American heartland using language that evoked romantic visions of the mythical American frontier and Old West. These stories of the achievement of the American Dream affirmed the notion of the United States as a place where anyone could succeed through hard work and fair play, even as the environment that had produced their ascent had, by the 1920s, become a distant memory for many, amid an increasingly bureaucratized, industrial postwar modernity in which the United States was a global superpower, trending toward oligarchy, and the world's greatest consumer of mass spectacle.

Keywords:   horseracing, Teapot Dome, American Mythology, Progressive Era, Roaring Twenties, golden age of sports, Thoroughbred Racing, Harry F. Sinclair, sportswriters, 1920s America, American Dream, Harry F. Sinclair, Earl Sande, Old West, Frontier Myth, oligarchy, mass spectacle

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