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Broadway Goes to WarAmerican Theater during World War II$
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Robert L. McLaughlin and Sally E. Parry

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780813180946

Published to Kentucky Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.5810/kentucky/9780813180946.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM KENTUCKY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.kentucky.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright The University Press of Kentucky, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in KSO for personal use.date: 29 June 2022

Overseas

Overseas

Chapter:
(p.64) 3 Overseas
Source:
Broadway Goes to War
Author(s):

Robert L. McLaughlin

Sally E. Parry

Publisher:
University Press of Kentucky
DOI:10.5810/kentucky/9780813180946.003.0003

A major factor that affected most Americans' experience of the war is that it was always elsewhere. One role of U.S. popular culture during the war was to bring home aspects of the war, including the heroism, the suffering, the occupation, and resistance that were occurring in Britain, Europe, Africa, the Soviet Union, Asia, and the Pacific. The most successful overseas plays, such as The Wookey, The Moon Is Down, The Eve of St. Mark, and Flare Path, emphasize the element of democracy, manifested in the right to criticize authority and the right to make one's own decisions, to contrast the Allies' way of fighting the war with the fascist enemy's. They also emphasize that the individual's decision to sacrifice, fight, and die is most genuine and thus most valuable when it is motivated by some kind of personal connection.

Keywords:   Occupation, Resistance, The Wookey, The Moon is Down, The Eve of St. Mark, Flare Path

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